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5 Best Plants To Keep Your Indoor Air Clean

31 Dec

Now that it’s Winter, we are all indoors more often than not. We need to think about keeping our indoor air clean, which can be hard to do in colder climates. According to NASA, there are several houseplants that are superstars at
cleaning the air and putting oxygen back into your indoor atmosphere. Plants purify air, making them part of what NASA calls “nature’s life support system.”
There are five plants that are relatively easy to care for, do not need a lot of light or water and are the best air cleaners, according to the NASA study.

1. Peace Lily- a relatively easy plant. It will work in low light situations and needs very little water.
2. Florist’s Chrysanthemum- usually associated with being outdoors in the
garden, this plant is a work horse when it comes to cleaning indoor air.PeaceLilyChrysanthemum

These first two plants remove benzene, formaldehyde, trichloroethylene, xylene
and toluene as well as ammonia.

 

English Ivy

3. English Ivy- again a plant that can thrive even if neglected.Snake_plant

 

4. Snake Plant- also known as “mother-in-law tongue” because of its sharp edges, it can withstand low light and a bit of neglect. Just check its water once in a while, in winter it may only need water once every other month!

 

Red Edged Dracena

 

5. Red Edged Dracena- again can stand lower light levels, but may need to be fertilized a couple times a month during growing periods.

These last three remove all the toxins that the first two remove, except for the ammonia.

 

So whether you need to clean up the air in your home or your office, these are just five of the plants NASA recommends in helping prevent “sick building syndrome.”  There is a TED talk related to this clean air study that is really interesting.

Here’s to your health!

 

http://www.deluxdrapery.com

5 Best Plants To Keep Your Indoor Air Clean

30 Dec

Now that it’s Winter, we are all indoors more often than not. We need to think about keeping our indoor air clean, which can be hard to do in colder climates. According to NASA, there are several houseplants that are superstars at
cleaning the air and putting oxygen back into your indoor atmosphere. Plants purify air, making them part of what NASA calls “nature’s life support system.”
There are five plants that are relatively easy to care for, do not need a lot of light or water and are the best air cleaners, according to the NASA study.

1. Peace Lily- a relatively easy plant. It will work in low light situations and needs very little water.
2. Florist’s Chrysanthemum- usually associated with being outdoors in the
garden, this plant is a work horse when it comes to cleaning indoor air.PeaceLilyChrysanthemum

These first two plants remove benzene, formaldehyde, trichloroethylene, xylene
and toluene as well as ammonia.

 

English Ivy

3. English Ivy- again a plant that can thrive even if neglected.Snake_plant

 

4. Snake Plant- also known as “mother-in-law tongue” because of its sharp edges, it can withstand low light and a bit of neglect. Just check its water once in a while, in winter it may only need water once every other month!

 

Red Edged Dracena

 

5. Red Edged Dracena- again can stand lower light levels, but may need to be fertilized a couple times a month during growing periods.

These last three remove all the toxins that the first two remove, except for the ammonia.

 

So whether you need to clean up the air in your home or your office, these are just five of the plants NASA recommends in helping prevent “sick building syndrome.”  There is a TED talk related to this clean air study that is really interesting.

Here’s to your health!

 

http://www.deluxdrapery.com

Calming Colors Can Change The Mood Of Your Home.

16 Dec

CalmingColors1These subtle hues will help you relax and de-stress.

The colors you choose to decorate your home add to its beauty and style, but did you ever think about how they can affect your mood and level of stress? Color is a factor in making your home a stress-free zone that relaxes you and elevates your feeling of calm.

 

To make your rooms a peaceful refuge, think ahead when you select your design colors:

CalmingColors2

  • Select cool colors, such as blue, violet and blue-green.
  • Use soft, muted shades of almost any color, including powder blue, sage green, pale pink and gentle salmon.
  • Create a calm look with neutral shades, such as cream, ivory and pale gray.

Use calming colors for a variety of your home décor elements, including paint, rugs and carpeting, upholstery, bed linens and more. Looking for even more peace and harmony in your home? Focus on reducing the clutter and chaos; that will go a long way in helping you feel more relaxed and calm.

 

CalmingColors3Just to play devil’s advocate … be aware that the mood you want to create may be different in the various rooms of your home. In rooms where you want to feel energized and productive, such as your kitchen or home office, you might want to avoid calming colors and instead select bright hues to raise your energy level.

 

Think ahead about your need for relaxation and a mellow mood before you select the colors for your interior design. Then sit back, relax and enjoy your home!

 

 

http://www.deluxdrapery.com

Lighting Can Make All The Difference

29 Apr

Light – and the light fixtures you select – bring beauty to a room and its elements.Lighting3

At the same time good lighting is essential for functionality. One type of lighting isn’t enough for most rooms; layering lighting and thoughtful placement will make your rooms look beautiful and work optimally.

1. Start with ambient lighting.
Also called general lighting, this type of light washes over a room in a non-focused way – and even includes natural sunlight coming through the windows.
Ambient lighting includes ceiling light fixtures and chandeliers, lights on ceiling fans, track lighting and recessed ceiling lights that are not sharply directed, and torchiere lamps. Continue reading

A Breath of Fresh Air

20 Feb

A Breath of Fresh Air

Did you know that Americans spend about 90% of their lives indoors?

Whether it’s home, work, or a vehicle, we are stuck inside a lot.  Homes used to be more open to the outdoors.  Now we close up and insulate, which is great for warmth but not for air quality.  It’s like living in a plastic food container, it will only keep fresh for so long.  We go through a lot of work sealing the windows with plastic, FreshAir1investing in honeycomb shades and piling on blankets at night to stay warm and healthy.  However, there is a benefit to opening up your windows for 20 minutes a day, even in winter.

You need clean, fresh air for your lungs.  You don’t always notice how stuffy your home is until you walk in from outside.  Most of the time, you can smell the difference.  Many may argue that they live in the city where the air isn’t fresh or clean.  So they keep their home sealed up and invest in an air purifier.  Which is good, just make sure to change the filter frequently.

But opening a window will help circulate stale air out and bring oxygen in.  In fact, when the house is airtight, there are higher levels of carbon dioxide which can lead to headaches and fatigue.  When you open the window, you let fresh oxygen in, not the FreshAir2rancid oxygen being breathed over and over.  If you’re concerned about wasting money on the thermostat, turn off the heat and open your windows during the late morning so you get the best advantage of the sun to warm the space. You also can turn the ceiling fan to move in reverse, sometimes called the winter setting, which helps circulate warm air down.

Some worry that the cold air will get them sick.  But we have learned that it is not being cold that makes us catch cold.  It’s a virus.  And again, where do we spend almost all of our time?  Inside.  You are harboring more bacteria by keeping the home closed up than opening a window.

With that being said, open your windows!

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